Author Topic: Easy Come, Easy Go  (Read 4789 times)

Aloha_float

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    • Fuel Additives for corrosion and sludge control
"Beach House" 1983 Tartan 33

Jocelyn

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009, 11:36:26 PM »
Hello there. I did see the first web site a few weeks ago during a search. I never saw the second site but the slide shows are well done. It was nice to see the owners enjoying the project and it paid off at the end. I am sure they have much to share with the rest of the gang having gone through all these projects. I wonder why they never register with this association?     

GCOLLINS

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2009, 04:45:58 PM »
Wow, it's going to take a while to read all of this...  I'd give the electrical work only an 8 of 10 though, for two reasons:
1) only 6 AWG wire from the batteries?  I don't think that's thick enough.  I used 2 AWG on Tardis.
2) no fuses on the supply lines - not required when the boat was built, but required by current ABYC standards if the run is > 72".  Which I'm betting it is, as it is on Tardis.

The deck painting looks good.  I'll have to come back to read more later!

Aloha_float

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2009, 08:58:51 PM »
Does the breaker panel not replace the fuses?  I had installed 2 new panels which were previously fused and are now breakers.  I saw that he installed the same panel and it includes breakers.  I thought he did a good job.  Would you like to see the spider nest behind my breaker panels?

I need to study his site as I plan to do some more work next spring before I go back in the water.

One modification on the top of the list is the dripless seal.  I want a dry bilge!!!

T
"Beach House" 1983 Tartan 33

GCOLLINS

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2009, 06:27:07 PM »
Hey Tim
ABYC says that any wire more than 72 inches long that is connected to a battery is to be fused with a fuse appropriate to the wire gage.  So for the main feed that goes from the battery up to the battery switch, it's probably more than 72" and it should have a fuse in it.  Mine run from the battery terminal to a 300 amp fuse (starting circuit) and 50 amp fuse (house circuit) that are mounted on the aft face of the aft bulkhead (in the strbd locker).  From there the wire runs to the battery switch.

The logic is this: if one of those wires comes loose or is work through, it can carry enough current to burn through metal, start a fire, whatever.  Therefore it should be fused as close as possible to the battery as realistic.  ref: ABYC E11, section 11.12.1.2

Same logic applies to anything else not connected through the circuit breaker panel - say for example you've got the stereo hooked up to always draw power to keep the clock/memory running.  Or an automatic bilge pump...  should have a properly sized fuse in line as close to the battery as you can reasonably do it.

Actually, here's my schematic.

Aloha_float

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2009, 11:35:17 AM »
This is great.  I will use it this spring when I start my next stage of enhancements.

Tim
"Beach House" 1983 Tartan 33

GCOLLINS

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2009, 08:28:28 PM »
I should note, there are a couple of fuses missing from my schematic - the wiring to the voltmeter is fused.

sam

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Re: Easy Come, Easy Go
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2009, 11:54:02 PM »
Hi folks...thanks for the feedback.  It was a great project and we're looking forward to next summer.  I used this site a lot during the project, got some of your help during the work on this forum and VERY much appreciated the help.  I also did try to register as an owner several times, but it never popped on the list...it was right after the passing of the previous moderator, so perhaps I'll try again.

For the electrical system, I did mount two fuses next to the batteries before the cables get to the on/off switches, and I have the circuit breaker panel installed for all of the accessories.  I do need to convert my hand drawn schematics so I can upload them to my restoration blog.

It's been two years and the paint looks great still, but for a first job, I'm very happy with it.  Will keep working on the blog page once winter sets in.

Thanks again!

Sam